Louisville Orchestra in Survival Mode

"Music Makes a City" documentary of the Louisville Orchestra in celebration of its 75 anniversary

One thing to keep in mind with these discussions of Orchestras (at least in the states) is that there is a definite separation between the Orchestra itself as an organization (e.g. Louisville Orchestra) and the musicians and their organizations that make up the heart of the Orchestra (e.g. Louisville Orchestra Musicians Association; Keep Louisville Symphonic).

As I’ve been posting in various places on the interwebs, Drew McManus (as usual) has a really great round-up of many of the articles and pieces regarding the latest LO news: http://www.adaptistration.com/2011/06/02/events-heat-up-in-louisville/

In particular some of us are very interested in the attempts of the LO to short circuit many initiatives and avenues for the musicians’ voices (see the discussion about the KLS clause in the comments section in particular).

But what was really interesting was a sindicated piece I read earlier today in the Taipei Times (from where I adapted the title to this blog post) titled, “City orchestras in survival mode: The instability of support from private sponsors and large corporations is forcing cultural institutions to return to the drawing board,” by Vivian Schweitzer.  The piece caught my attention in particular because it uses the Louisville Orchestra as a frame of reference for the discussion of what the “Chicken Little Think Tank” are calling the [Orchestral] Classical Music crisis.  In particular references to the fomation of the LO and its rise after the flood of ’37 into what was for many years a highly respected status internationally. 

All of this comes to us in the DVD documentary, Music Makes a City, which the piece references:

Music Makes a City, an engaging documentary from last year about the Louisville Orchestra that was just released on DVD, offers an inspiring and cautionary tale of creative chutzpah and financial mismanagement. The orchestra, which itself filed for bankruptcy in December, was founded shortly after the floods that crippled Louisville, Kentucky, in 1937.

It began as a ragtag ensemble that rehearsed, according to the film, “in a gloomy room that smelled of stale beer.” A young conductor, Robert Whitney, quickly drummed the ensemble into shape, but financial problems loomed from the start. Charles Farnsley, the mayor of Louisville from 1948 to 1953, suggested that the orchestra, instead of spending money on glamorous soloists, commission new pieces: a policy that the board, though initially shocked, adopted. The endeavor was facilitated in 1953 by a US$400,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation to commission and record 52 compositions a year for three years. The DVD features lively interviews with some of the composers chosen, including Elliott Carter.

This remarkable venture, which resulted in works by Lukas Foss, Paul Hindemith, Roy Harris, Gunther Schuller and many others, put Louisville and its orchestra on the international cultural map and attracted luminaries like Shostakovich and Martha Graham to visit the city. But that wasn’t enough to fend off the regular financial crises that have dogged the orchestra over the decades since, until its recent bankruptcy filing.

I don’t want to make this post commentary heavy, but did want to share the above quote for some historical context–do read the Taipei Times piece!

I also found a recent blog post by another local blogger and pianist at Behind a Box of Strings that’s worth a read: http://youresomodest.blogspot.com/2011/06/learning-from-history.html

And another WFPL piece that recently popped up titled Possiblilities for the Louisville Orchestra.

And here’s a trailer for Music Makes a City:

Monday Cello Coaching Reflections

Mondays are usually a cello coaching day for me–at least during the k-12 school year.  Nearly every afternoon I coach the cello section of the Floyd Central High School 7th period Orchestra.  This is a high school group that has gone every year for 21 (or maybe 22 or 23?  I lost count) years in a row to the state level.

This year 6 of the student cellists in this orchestra were members of the Indiana All-State Orchestra (a total of 13 students from Floyd Central High School were in this year’s All-State Orchestra) which, proportionally speaking (as well as from an absolute number standpoint) for the cello section (which I think had 13 members this year) and from the standpoint of the orchestra as a whole is the most students from one school to have privilege of being members.

Pound for pound, this is likely the strongest string section in the orchestra.

The repertoire that they will be playing for this year’s state contest, and with which I’ve been coaching them (since Fall of 2008), is the finale of Dvořák’s Slavonic Dance No. 8, Op. 46; Bach’s Air on G which is an adaptation of the second movement from his Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D major, BWV 1068 (this is the Stokowski arrangement–meaning the cellos get the melody throughout the whole piece); and the finale to Shostakovich’s  Symphony No. 5 in d minor, Op. 47.

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