>Old Master Q

>Old Master Q

If you want to ask which comic strip in Chinese history has never died out, has been on the comic sales ladder for a long time, and has became a part of the international Chinese society, undoubtedly it is Alfonso Wong’s “Old Master Q”.

from:
A Brief Background of Alfonso Wong (in English)
A Brief Background of Alfonso Wong (in Mandarin)

Every once in a while I’ll post about Alfonso Wong’s Old Master Q. No real reason other than to maybe draw in comics fans that are looking for something other than US comics or manga.

First published as a strip in 1962, Old Master Q has been on the big and small screen, as well as on the stage:

What would Old Master Q look like on the big screen? Since the 1960’s, “Old Master Q” has been made into 4 Cantonese and 2 Mandarin cartoon animations, TV series and plays. In 2000 Tsui Hark’s Film Workship used “Old Master Q” as the movie’s theme, producing a live-action movie with 3D cartoon characters. The laughter was endless because of the cameo appearance of the comic’s 76 year old creator Alfonso Wong.

from:
Old Master Q is Timeless (in English)
Old Master Q Is Timeless (in Mandarin)

Old Master Q has enjoyed popularity throughout Asia and as you can see from this example below and from the dailies at the website, like a number of far eastern and south-east asian comics there’s far less emphasis on text-driven storytelling.

Old Master Q 2004-10-04

The difference between what I’m calling text-driven narratives and image/dance-driven narratives will be one of the major focuses here at Mae Mai since the climate seems to be rife for it given the so-called “manga invasion” and all the discussions regarding it on the net.

Related Links:
Emaki Productions
The Grammar of Manga” Matt Thorn, April 2005
Image [&] Narrative Online Magazine of the Visual Narrative
Manga story-telling/showing” Aarnoud Rommens, August 2000
Matt Thorn’s website

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2 thoughts on “>Old Master Q

  1. >Hey! I’m a huge fan of Old Master Q!! And I have to say that it is probably THE single most important Chinese language commic created in the 20th Century, though certainly not the only infuential one.You may also like to look at “13 dots”, which is the 1960s Chinese-version of girl-oriented comics. My mother read this when she was young, and interestingly enough, it evolved completely in isolation from Japanese manga, resembling Old Master Q in its storytelling, and actually using Richie Rich as the inspiration for its art.

  2. >Yay! Another Old Master Q fan! It seems like no-one here in the states even knows about this (well, I guess anyone that read my old blog knew, because I’d post about it every few months).”13 dots”, which is the 1960s Chinese-version of girl-oriented comics.Excellent! I’ll have to find this then!it evolved completely in isolation from Japanese manga, resembling Old Master Q in its storytelling, and actually using Richie Rich as the inspiration for its art.Now that–is VERY interesting to me. Thanks for mentioning it, now I’ll probably go crazy trying to find copies/collections of it!

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